Call For Volunteers

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Mann-Simons Volunteer Training

Meet new people, learn new skills and discover the history and culture of Columbia and Richland County by volunteering with Historic Columbia at the Mann-Simons Site.

Historic Columbia invites the public to help share the history of the Mann-Simons family and become a volunteer tour guide of the newly interpreted site during the Mann-Simons Site Volunteer Training on Monday, Oct. 9 from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. This training session will consist of the following: a sample tour of the site, an overview of the family, history of the site, broad topics related to the site: slavery, Jim Crow, civil rights and urban renewal, and a day in the life of a volunteer, which will cover logistics of giving tours and other opportunities at the site. Volunteer training is free. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided at the training.

Additional Volunteer Training Sessions this fall:

November 13 – Woodrow Wilson Family Home Training

December 11 – Robert Mills House Training (details to come)

As a volunteer for Historic Columbia, you will:

  • Receive a 15 percent discount on purchases at the Gift Shop at Robert Mills.
  • Enjoy complimentary admission to our historic museums for yourself and members of your immediate family.
  • Attend special Historic Columbia functions for free or at reduced rates.
  • Receive a free subscription to Historically Speaking, Historic Columbia’s quarterly newsletter.
  • Tour and visit other historic site during monthly volunteer meetings and presentations.
  • Plus, make new friends and share experiences with others who have similar passions.

 

For information, visit historiccolumbia.org, email bkleinfelder@historiccolumbia.org or call (803) 252-1770 x 24.

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October 2017 Events

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October 2017 is full of treats with community favorites such as the annual Scarecrows in the Garden Exhibit, Spirits Alive! Cemetery Tour, The Palladium Society Silent Auction, and Trunk or Treat, as well as monthly events such as Second Sunday Stroll and Dollar Sunday. October also includes the opportunity to become a Historic Columbia volunteer with the Mann-Simons Site Volunteer Training. Below is a list of Historic Columbia’s October events. Visit historiccolumbia.org for more information.

CALENDAR OF PROGRAMS & EVENTS:

Scarecrows in the Garden

Oct. 1 – 31 | All Day Event | Gardens of the Robert Mills House

Scarecrows have taken over the Robert Mills House gardens! This free exhibit features handcrafted scarecrows made by local families, business, organizations and classrooms. On a stroll through the gardens this fall, you’ll see dozens of ghoulish, historic and colorful scarecrows. Keep an eye out for “Sneaky Steve,” a mischievous scarecrow hiding somewhere on the grounds in a new location each week. For information, visit historiccolumbia.org, email reservations@historiccolumbia.org, or call (803) 252-1770 x 23.

Behind-the-Scenes Tour | Mid-Century Modern

Thursday, Oct. 5 | 6 – 7:30 p.m. | 4100 Block on Kilbourne St. in Heathwood

Get an inside look at former home of Lester Bates Jr. This architect-designed mid-century home is nestled in the Heathwood neighborhood. Current owners will share stories of curating modern furniture on a budget, as well as a few renovation trials and tribulations. This house showcases some of the most quintessential mid-century furnishings designed by Harvey Probber, Florence Knoll, Thayer Coggins, Heywood-Wakefield, Eero Saarinen, and the architectural style of the home and extensive use of glass and open design concepts to help forge a connection with nature. It was designed by Robert Jackson, Jr., whose firm, Jackson and Miller Architects, also designed Palmetto Health Baptist hospital and the former Maxwell Furniture store on Main Street. Take a walk through a home so carefully restored, you’ll feel like an extra from Mad Men.

Tickets are $25 for members and $30 for non-members, and registration is for members only until Sept. 28. For more information,  email or call (803) 252-7742 x 15.

Preservation Workshop | Do’s and Don’ts of Historic Home Renovation

Saturday, Oct. 7 | 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. | Seibels House

Historic Columbia’s 2017 Preservation Workshop series, presented by Crawlspace Medic, returns in October. Historic Columbia and the Committee for the Restoration and Beautification of Randolph Cemetery (CRBRC) will host a Preservation Workshop at the Seibels House to explore the ins and outs of renovating and maintaining a historic house. The workshop, led by Sean Stucker, director of facilities for Historic Columbia, and Staci Richey, owner of Access Preservation (which specializes in window restoration) and board member of the CRBRC, will lead attendees through a presentation and discussion that offers tips and examines how to plan, outline and manage a home rehab project. Participants will go on to explore work done over the decades at the Seibels House and will have the chance to check out ongoing and recent renovations at several neighboring properties. The Seibels House is located at 1601 Richland St. Light refreshments are included, and tickets for the workshop are $5 for members and $10 for non-members. To purchase tickets, email reservations@historiccolumbia.org or call (803) 252-1770 x 23.

Second Sunday Stroll | Melrose Heights

Sunday, Oct. 8 | 2 – 3:30 p.m. | Tour begins at Melrose Park

Explore the Melrose Heights neighborhood with Historic Columbia from 2 – 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 8 during the monthly Second Sunday Stroll presented by Seed Architecture. The guided walking tour will travel through the historic neighborhood, which was recently listed as an historic site on the National Register of Historic Places. Stops will include highlights of various architectural styles, kit homes popular in the 1910s and historic locations in one of Columbia’s earliest suburbs. The tour will begin at Melrose Park located at 1500 Fairview Drive. Tickets are free for members and $8/adult and $5/youth for non-members. To purchase tickets, visit historccolumbia.org, email reservations@historiccolumbia.org, or call (803) 252-1770 x 23.

Mann-Simons Site Volunteer Training

Monday, Oct. 9 | 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. | Mann-Simons Site

Historic Columbia invites the public to help share the history of the Mann-Simons family and become a volunteer tour guide of the newly interpreted site. This training session will consist of the following: a sample tour of the site, an overview of the family, history of the site, broad topics related to the site: slavery, Jim Crow, civil rights and urban renewal, and a day in the life of a volunteer, which will cover logistics of giving tours and other opportunities at the site. Volunteer training is free. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided at the training.

As a volunteer for Historic Columbia, you will:

  • Receive a 15 percent discount on purchases at the Gift Shop at Robert Mills.
  • Enjoy complimentary admission to our historic museums for yourself and members of your immediate family.
  • Attend special Historic Columbia functions for free or at reduced rates.
  • Receive a free subscription to Historically Speaking, Historic Columbia’s quarterly newsletter.
  • Tour and visit other historic site during monthly volunteer meetings and presentations.
  • Plus, make new friends and share experiences with others who have similar passions.

 

For information, visit historiccolumbia.org, email bkleinfelder@historiccolumbia.org or call (803) 252-1770 x 24.

Spirits Alive!

Thursday, Oct. 12 | 6 – 9:30 p.m. | Elmwood Cemetery

Grab your flashlights and join Historic Columbia and Elmwood Cemetery staff for guided tours presenting some of Columbia’s eerie and peculiar past by the light of the moon. Different than the regular monthly tours, Spirits Alive! Cemetery Tours feature costumed tour guides, snacks and other Halloween-related activities. Tickets are $8/adults and $4/youth for members and $12/adult and $6/youth for non-members. To purchase tickets, visit historccolumbia.org, email reservations@historiccolumbia.org, or call (803) 252-1770 x 23.

Dollar Sunday | Woodrow Wilson Family Home

Sunday, Oct. 15 | 1 – 4 p.m. | Woodrow Wilson Family Home

Residents of Richland and Lexington Counties are invited to take a guided tour of one of our historic museums for just $1. This month, visit the Woodrow Wilson Family Home for Dollar Sunday. General admission prices apply for any house tours after the first. Walk-ins welcome! Tours leave at the top of the hour from 1 – 4 p.m. Purchase admission and meet for tours at the Gift Shop at Robert Mills. For information, visit historccolumbia.org, email reservations@historiccolumbia.org, or call (803) 252-1770 x 23.

Bluegrass, Bidding & BBQ | The Palladium Society’s 14th Annual Silent Auction

Thursday, Oct. 19 | 7 – 10 p.m. | Robert Mills House & Gardens

Join Historic Columbia’s The Palladium Society (TPS) at the 14th annual Bluegrass, Bidding & BBQ fundraiser presented by Jaguar Land Rover Columbia. This annual celebration of live music, delicious barbeque, specialty drinks and an assortment of silent auction items will be held from 7 – 10 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 19 on the grounds of the Robert Mills House & Gardens, located at 1616 Blanding Street in downtown Columbia. This year’s silent auction will feature a variety of items, including destination packages to historic cities across the Southeast, experiential packages to explore local cultural sites, behind-the-scenes tours of Columbia’s hot spots, gift cards to restaurants, boutiques, gyms and much more. Ticket prices are $25 for TPS members, $35 for Historic Columbia members and $45 for the general public. Tickets are $50 at the door. All proceeds will support Historic Columbia. For information, visit historccolumbia.org, email lmojkowski@historiccolumbia.org, or call

(803) 252-1770 x 15.

Trunk or Treat

Friday, Oct. 27 | 5:30 – 7 p.m. | Robert Mills House Parking Lot

Put on your costume and join Historic Columbia as we bring the fun of Halloween to the Robert Mills House during Trunk or Treat! Children will enjoy trick-or-treating with a twist in a safe and fun environment. Community members and organizations will display decorated trunks filled with candy in the parking lot of the Robert Mills House. Awards and prizes for best costumes and best decorated trunk will be given at 6:45 p.m. Don’t forget to visit the Gift Shop at Robert Mills and check out the Scarecrows in the Garden during this free event!

Trunk or Treat Vehicle Participation: Historic Columbia is accepting registrations for businesses and organizations and families to place a decorated vehicle at the event. This is a great opportunity for businesses and organizations to promote their mission, give away branded merchandise, and hand out candy to hundreds of children at a free community event.

Vehicle owners must register via email by Monday, October 24. To register, send an email to reservations@historiccolumbia.org with the following information:

  • Name
  • Organization (if applicable)
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Email address
  • Make/Model/Color of vehicle

 

Registered vehicles should arrive between 4:30 and 5:15 p.m. When giving out toys prizes or candy, remember that children will range in age from infants to young teens. Electricity will not be provided to registered vehicles in the event area, so please bring flashlights. Attendance is estimated at 400 families for the event. Please plan accordingly. For information, visit historiccolumbia.org, email reservations@historiccolumbia.org or call (803) 252-1770 x 23.

 

HOUSE TOURS:                

Historic House Museum Tours
Tuesday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday: 1 – 5 p.m.

Historic Columbia’s historic house museum tours offer a peek into the past! Tour the Robert Mills House & Gardens, Hampton-Preston Mansion & Gardens, Mann-Simons Site or the Woodrow Wilson Family Home to learn more about Columbia’s history. Tours are free for members, $8 for adults, $5 youth (ages 6-17) and free for children under 5. Visit historiccolumbia.org for more information. 

Group Tours Historic Columbia is happy to arrange a private guided tour for groups of 10 or more with advance registration. Bus tours are available. To schedule a group tour, call (803) 252-1770 x 23 or email reservations@historiccolumbia.org.

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Another Amazing Jubilee!

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On Saturday, Sept. 16, thousands of people made their way to the Mann-Simons Site for the 39th Annual Jubilee: Festival of Black History & Culture.

Special thanks goes to our wonderful sponsors without whom, this festival would not be possible.

 

Thanks also to our fantastic vendors, stalwart volunteers, dedicated HC staff and everyone who came out on this beautiful day to celebrate African American music, culture and history in Columbia, South Carolina. See you next year for the 40th Anniversary of Jubilee!

2017 Jubilee Wrap-Up video (short)

Kitty Wilson-Evans with an amazing acapella “Summertime”

For the whole album of Jubilee 2017 images, CLICK HERE.

If you joined us at Jubilee and are interested in volunteering to give tours of this important house, please consider coming to the Mann-Simons Volunteer Training on Oct. 9 from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. to find out more!

 

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39th Annual Jubilee Honors South Carolina Musicians

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On Saturday, September 16, the corner of Marion and Richland Streets will fill with singing as the 39th Annual Jubilee Festival of Black History and Culture takes place.

This year’s festival will celebrate the lives of two of South Carolina’s most influential musicians—John Blackwell and Skipp Pearson—both of whom died earlier this year.

Blackwell was a Columbia native who landed his breakthrough appearance playing with Patti LaBelle on her Grammy-winning LP, Live! One Night Only. In 2000, Prince recruited Blackwell to play drums in his band, New Power Generation, which he did for more than a decade. Blackwell appears on several of Prince’s LPs, including 2003’s N.E.W.S.

Pearson, South Carolina’s Ambassador of Jazz, was a native of Orangeburg where he purchased his first saxophone for $.50. During his more than 50 year career, Pearson shared the stage with Otis Redding, Parri LaBelle, Miles Davis, and Sam Cooke, among many others. In 2008, Pearson performed at President Barack Obama’s inaugural ball in Washington. For nearly 17 years, he played jazz at Hunter-Gatherer every Thursday.

To honor the memory of these two musicians, the Jubilee Festival will celebrate the musical lineage of South Carolina with a headlining performance by Cheri Maree. Maree is an international recording artist, songwriter and author who brings “soul jazz” to the center stage. A multi-talented vocalist and musician raised in Columbia, S.C., Cheri’s eclectic sound and style have graced the stage with legendary Grammy-winning artists, including Patti LaBelle, Al Jarreau, Hootie and the Blowfish and Brian McKnight.

A handful of other performances from South Carolina musicians – representing a variety of genres, including R&B, jazz, gospel and soul – will take place throughout the festival.

Jubilee will feature historic storytelling, artist demonstrations and family-friendly activities. Throughout the day, guests are invited to take house tours of the Mann-Simons Site and the Modjeska Monteith Simkins House for $1 and take the African American Historic Sites Bus Tour for $2. In addition, there will be a variety of outdoor vendors selling food, beverages, art and wares.

Historic Columbia invites you to experience the free Jubilee festival at the Mann-Simons Site (1403 Richland Street) from 11 am – 6 pm on Saturday, September 16.

This article was originally published in The Columbia Star.

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Lost Landscapes

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By: Robin Waites

In 1961 the Ansley Hall Mansion, the Robert Mills-designed residence at 1616 Blanding Street, was under threat of demolition.  The call to preserve this landmark building turned into a rallying cry that led to the formation of Historic Columbia Foundation.  When we give tours of the property, known today as the Robert Mills House & Gardens, visitors are astounded that this regal, 1820s building was targeted for demolition.  At the time, the potential for new development on this four-acre lot blinded some to the significance of the existing building, which is now a major draw for tourists and a defining feature of local architectural and cultural history.  Unfortunately, many of our character-defining places have not been granted the same reprieve.

Before the adoption of the National Preservation Act in 1966 and subsequent establishment of the local Landmarks Commission (today’s Design Development Review Commission) the demolition of significant buildings went unregulated.  Although review guidelines have been in place for more than 50 years, we still experience the loss, particularly of those structures that may not be perceived as mainstream historic sites.  Over the last decade some of the unique buildings lost in this community include the Richland County Jail (SW corner of Hampton and Lincoln streets, George Elmore’s 5&10 Store (2317 Gervais Street), the Susannah Apartments (NE corner of Hampton and Bull streets), the Abbott Cigar Building (1300 Main Street) and several early 1900s residences along Devine Street.  While perhaps not as iconic as the Robert Mills House, each of these sites represented a time period, building style and/or historic event and provided context to our fast-changing built environment.

Just last week we watched an 100-year-old building on a central commercial corridor fall to the wrecking ball.  The structure at 1401 Assembly (NW corner of Washington and Assembly streets) stood at the entry point to the once-teeming Black Business District that centered around Washington Street.  By 1916, in addition to housing the blacked-owned Regal Drug Store on the first floor, upstairs were offices for two African American physicians and a lawyer, Nathaniel J. Frederick, who was an educator, lawyer, newspaper editor and civil rights activist.  Frederick argued more cases before the Supreme Court of South Carolina than any black lawyer of his day.  The building stood as a touchstone for the story of Frederick and many others, but also as one of fewer than 10 buildings remaining that were part of this early 20th century district.

1401 Assembly 1401_assembly_02 IMG_9534

When we walk through thriving historic districts like the Congaree Vista or Cottontown it is clear that the preservation of our built assets can serve as an economic engine as well as providing context for who we are as a community.  At Historic Columbia, we work actively to gain protections for endangered buildings and districts; however, key partners in this effort must include property owners, developers, real estate professionals, elected officials and the general public who reap the benefits and suffer the blows of the choices made in our built environment. Join our mission to save Columbia’s built history and get involved with Historic Columbia today. Become a member, join our volunteer force, make a donation, attend our events and follow along on social media. Visit historiccolumbia.org to learn how you can get involved.

 

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From Racial Uplift to Protest Politics: South Carolina’s Teacher Salary Equalization Campaign

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By: Candace Cunningham
Ph.D. Candidate
University of South Carolina

South Carolina’s 1940s teacher salary equalization campaign was one of the state’s most vibrant and impactful moments of black teacher activism. The state’s first three equalization cases—Malissa Theresa Smith, Eugene C. Hunt, and Viola Louis Duvall—originated in Charleston, but Duvall’s case was the only one to make it to federal district court. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) won Duvall’s case in 1944, but they were eager to guarantee salary equalization. When Albert N. Thompson, a teacher at Columbia’s Booker Washington Heights Elementary School, submitted his salary equalization petition to the Richland County School Board on June 7, 1944, the NAACP was more than willing to offer legal support. Thompson’s case would serve as the final nail in the coffin for unequal teacher salaries in South Carolina. The NAACP abandoned the local appeals process, and instead directly petitioned the federal district court.

On May 26, 1945, Judge Waites Waring ruled in Thompson’s favor, concluding that Columbia’s black teachers were entitled to a fair salary plan. Waring believed that since Duvall’s case, the school district had made an effort to alleviate unequal pay, but there was still a “startling disparity” between black and white teachers’ salaries, even when they had the same amount of experience. The Board had to begin a new classification system, effective spring 1946.

The state based the new classification system on the National Teacher Examination (NTE). Some white officials, such as Columbia school superintendent A. C. Flora, were hesitant to support the exam out of concern that it could prove that black teachers were better trained than some white teachers. But despite the overwhelming evidence that black teachers were dedicated professionals, they were also the products of an unequal education system. Ben D. Wood, the NTE creator, predicted that black teachers would score lower than white teachers. The South Carolina State Board of Education did a two-year study that supported Wood’s prediction, and beginning in 1945 all the state’s teachers were required to take the exam. Rev J. A. De Laine—the Clarendon County teacher who became the foremost leader in the state’s desegregation case, Briggs v. Elliott—rightly called the new certification program an “effort to legally dodge an equal salary decision by the Federal Court.”

South Carolina’s use of the NTE not only facilitated unequal salaries between black and white teachers but also emphasized the black community’s preexisting economic disparities. The gap between the highest and lowest paid teachers widened. Those who did well on the exam and earned higher wages were better financially situated to pursue advanced degrees and increase their earning potential. These additional economic and educational achievements helped legitimize the state’s use of standardized testing since white officials could now present this as proof of the exam’s alleged objectivity. Therefore, while race remained the defining factor in teacher salaries, post-NTE remuneration was also bound to individual socioeconomic status.

Nonetheless, the teacher salary equalization campaign also revealed the shifting tides of civil rights activism. These suits helped to increase the NAACP’s southern membership. They were sometimes the first experience African Americans had in formal protests and provided the foundation for a broader protest movement. Indeed, those who participated in the campaign found it transformative and defining. For NAACP secretary Modjeska Simkins the equalization campaign served as a catalyst—a move from racial uplift to protest politics. Furthermore, many of the individuals who helped realize teacher salary equalization—civil rights attorney Harold Boulware, teacher/activist Septima Clark, journalist/politician John McCray, military veteran/activist Osceola McKain, and Modjeska Simkins—would become seminal figures in the state’s civil rights movement. As this campaign transformed activists it also transformed the whole movement.

These individuals are only a few of the people who played a vital role in Columbia’s rich cultural history. To learn more about them and other black Carolinians please join Historic Columbia for one of its Lunch & Learn Series as it celebrates Black History Month, February 21 & 28, 12-1PM at the Mann-Simons Site, 1403 Richland Street.

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Absolute Slaves: Race, Law and Society in Antebellum South Carolina

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By Rochelle Outlaw, J.D., Ph.D. Candidate, USC

Today, South Carolina remains one of the most diverse states in the union. According to the 2015 census, nearly 37 percent of South Carolina’s residents identified as a racial minority. Approximately, 28 percent of the state’s population is African American. The state’s racial diversity is grounded in the history of the founding of the colony.

 
Closely linked to the island of Barbados, South Carolina was the only colony where blacks outnumbered whites at the turn of the eighteenth century. The arrival of African slaves and free people of color from Barbados and a limited number of white women in the colony all contributed to a society that was accepting of racial diversity and interracial relationships. Unlike other southern states including North Carolina and Virginia, South Carolina never adopted a one-drop rule and did not have an anti-miscegenation clause in its constitution until 1865.

 
Indeed, South Carolina society had changed by the beginning of the nineteenth century. Racial slavery was embedded in its society and whites viewed slavery as their key to prosperity. What did not change about the state, however, was that as such, South Carolina offers a unique opportunity to study race, law and society during the antebellum period.

 
To learn about the common-law definition of race and how it related to social and political thought on race in antebellum South Carolina, attend Historic Columbia’s Lunch and Learn series from noon – 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21. This session will be led by guest presenter, Rochelle Outlaw, J.D., Ph.D. Candidate at the University of South Carolina and will be held at the Mann-Simons Site located at 1403 Richland Street. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit historiccolumbia.org/BlackHistory, email reservations@historiccolumbia.org or call 803-252-1770 x 23.

 

This article was originally published in the Columbia Star.

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Call for Entertainment & Vendors for the 37th Annual Jubilee: Festival of Heritage!

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Jubilee marketplace

Be part of one of the Midlands’ most-anticipated festivals as an entertainer or vendor at Historic Columbia’s 37th annual Jubilee: Festival of Heritage on Saturday, September 19.

Historic Columbia is searching for entertainment acts that reflect Jubilee and African American heritage, such as drum and dance groups, gospel, jazz, blues and spoken word acts. The deadline for entertainment registration is July 15, and the entertainer application form is available at historiccolumbia.org.

Associations, churches, civic/service groups, health/medical organizations, charities and other businesses are all invited to participate in this year’s Jubilee. The cost to participate is $25 for non-profit vendors, $55 for marketplace vendors and $125 for food vendors. Spaces are limited and reserved on a first-come, first-served basis once approved by the vendor committee. One table and two chairs are provided at no charge; additional items such as electricity, extra tables and extra space are available for an additional charge of $15 to $25. Vendor application forms are available at historiccolumbia.org, and the deadline for registration is September 4.

Jubilee: Festival of Heritage celebrates the rich cultural heritage and entrepreneurial spirit of the Mann-Simons family. The festival is free and open to the public at the historic Mann-Simons Site at 1403 Richland St. For more information about Jubilee and the Mann-Simons Site, please visit historiccolumbia.org/jubilee, call 803.252.1770 x 36 or email jubilee@historiccolumbia.org.

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Dance the Night Away at the Big Apple on March 27!

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04252014_BigApple_0091
Historic Columbia and the dance team of Richard Durlach and Breedlove will step back in time at the historic Big Apple to present a night of swing dancing for Swingin’ at the Big Apple on Friday, March 27.

The night begins at 7 p.m. with a lesson in swing dance from Richard Durlach and Breedlove Dance Team. At 8 p.m., put those dance moves to the test during open dance with special guests from the Palmetto Swing Dance Association until 11 p.m. Swingin’ at the Big Apple is $5 for Historic Columbia and Palmetto Swing Dance Association members and $8 for the general public.

The Big Apple, located at 1000 Hampton Street in downtown Columbia, was originally built as the House of Peace Synagogue in 1915. Its Orthodox Jewish congregation outgrew the venue and sold it in 1936, paving the way for Elliot Wright and “Fat” Sam to open the Big Apple Night Club. The international dance craze known as the Big Apple would be born on the floor of this African-American club as a combination of many popular dances, including the Charleston and swing. The dance spread north and cemented the Big Apple as an important site in Columbia’s history.

Walk-ins are welcome, and tickets are available at historiccolumbia.org, by calling 803.252.1770 ext. 23 or by emailing reservations@historiccolumbia.org.

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Historic Columbia’s Jubilee: Festival of Heritage Celebrates 36 Years on August 23

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Celebrating the rich cultural heritage and entrepreneurial spirit of one African American family—who lived and worked on the same property in downtown Columbia, S.C. for more than 140 years—Historic Columbia presents the 36th annual Jubilee: Festival of Heritage. This free, family-friendly event will be held at the Mann-Simons Site at 1403 Richland Street from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, August 23.

For 36 years, families and friends have come from across the state to celebrate African American heritage at Jubilee. When the festival started in 1978, it was a small community celebration of African American heritage and history. Over the years, Jubilee has grown into a can’t-miss event that draws attendees from all over the state and region.

This year’s Jubilee celebrates the legacies of the Mann-Simons family as well as Modjeska Monteith Simkins. The expanded, two-block festival will span the 1900 and 2000 blocks of Marion Street, stretching from the Mann-Simons Site at the corner of Richland and Marion streets to the Modjeska Simkins House at the corner of Marion and Elmwood streets. Both sites serve as tangible links between early 19th-century African American life and the civil rights and social justice movements that arose from these roots.

More than 3,000 guests attended the festival in 2013 to celebrate the remarkable life of Celia Mann and her descendants with a variety of activities, including hands-on demonstrations, an array of musical entertainment, and vendors with African-influenced and traditional merchandise. This year, multi-generational crowds will enjoy the following:

Live Entertainment!

Demonstrations and Crafts!

Hands-on demonstrations and craft tents from some of the region’s most skilled artists and craftsmen, including:

Discounted Tours and Exhibits!

Tour the Mann-Simons Site ($1 admission), take the celebrated bus tour, “Home places, work places, resting places: African-American Heritage Sites Tour” ($2), and view the new exhibit at Modjeska Monteith Simkins House ($1), exploring the life of Modjeska Monteith Simkins, considered “the matriarch of Civil Rights activists of South Carolina.” The new exhibit and accompanying outdoor interpretive signage broadens audiences’ understanding of the past, present and future through disciplines of history, archeology, African American and southern studies.

Street Fair!

An assortment of exhibitors, vendors and purveyors of tasty food and drink will be on hand, and Marion Street between Richland and Elmwood will be blocked off for this vibrant fair! Historic Columbia is accepting applications for vendors until August 8 (applications can be found at historiccolumbia.org).

Friends of Jubilee

Are you interested in supporting this free community festival? Become a Friend of Jubilee! With your donation to Jubilee, you will receive recognition at the festival, free tour passes and more. Visit historiccolumbia.org to learn more and make a donation.

Jubilee: Festival of Heritage is sponsored by Publix Super Markets Charities; The LINKS, Inc.; Johnson, Toal & Battiste; AT&T; The Big DM and Hot 103.9; Carolina Panorama; McDonald’s; AARP of South Carolina; The Office of Jim Clyburn; Elam Financial Group; Palmer Memorial Chapel; South State Bank; Vista Smiles; Party Reflections; Ahern Rentals; City of Columbia; Richland County; and the Cultural Council of Richland and Lexington.

For more information on the 36th annual Jubilee: Festival of Heritage, please visit historiccolumbia.org or call 803.252.1770 ext. 23.

 

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